Course Descriptions

BIO 105: Biology in the Modern World

  • Principles and concepts of biology including cellular structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, homeostasis, reproduction, heredity, diversity of life, ecology, evolution and animal behavior. Emphasis on human affairs and human examples.
  • Offered in Spring, Summer and Fall.
  • 3 credit hours.
  • No prerequisite class needed.
  • Intended for non-science students, this class provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biology.

BIO 106: Biology in the Modern World, Laboratory

  • Laboratory experience in biological principles to complement BIO 105.
  • Offered in Spring and Fall.
  • 1 credit hour.
  • BIO 105 must be taken with, or before, this class.
  • Intended for non-science students, this class provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of biology.

BIO 140: Survey of Animal Diversity

  • Classification and phylogeny of animals, patterns of diversification in body design and relationship between body design and the environment, and study of selected animal assemblages.
  • Offered in Fall only.
  • 3 credit hours.
  • No prerequisite class needed.
  • Intended for non-science students, this class provides a comprehensive introduction to animal diversity.

BIO 181: Introductory Biology: Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity

  • Emphasis on interactions of organisms with their environments; evolutionary change and role of natural selection in the evolution of life forms; biological diversity in the context of form and function of organisms; and critical thinking, problem solving and effective communication.
  • Offered in Spring and Fall.
  • 4 credit hours.
  • No prerequisite class needed.
  • Intended for both non-science students and students planning to pursue advanced study in science, this class provides a comprehensive introduction to ecology, evolution and diversity.

BIO 183: Introductory Biology: Cellular and Molecular Biology

  • Basic concepts and principles of molecular, cellular and developmental biology. Emphasis will be on the physical basis of life; the cell as the fundamental unit of life; the mechanisms involved in the development of multicellular organisms; and critical thinking, problem solving, experimental design and effective communication.
  • Offered in Spring and Fall.
  • 4 credit hours.
  • BIO 181 or an equivalent class must be completed before taking this class.
  • Intended for both non-science students and students planning to pursue advanced study in science, this class provides a comprehensive introduction to cellular and molecular biology.

BIO 233: Human-Animal Interactions

  • This course is designed to explore the relationship humans share with other animals and nature. We will study the early history of animal domestication and the influence of animals on human culture and religion. We will also explore our relationships to animals as pets, food, research subjects and wildlife.
  • Offered in Summer only.
  • 3 credit hours.
  • No prerequisite class needed.
  • Intended for both non-science students and students planning to pursue advanced study in science, this class provides a comprehensive introduction to human-animal interactions.

BIO 315: General Parasitology

  • General principles of parasitic symbiosis. Emphasis on life cycles, epidemiology and pathology of major parasites of humans and domestic animals.
  • Offered in Summer only.
  • 3 credit hours.
  • College-level biology prerequisite classes, equivalent to BIO 181 and BIO 183, are needed.
  • Intended for students with college-level background in biology, this class provides a rigorous introduction to the discipline of parasitology.

BIO 405: Functional Histology

  • Functional Histology describes the cellular structure of tissues and organs. Human organs are emphasized, with brief consideration given to variation in other mammals. Tissue and organ structure is related to function, including examples of malfunction (histopathology).
  • Offered in Summer only.
  • 3 credit hours.
  • A college-level cellular and molecular biology prerequisite class, equivalent to BIO 183, is needed.
  • Intended for students with college-level background in cellular and molecular biology, this class provides a rigorous introduction to the discipline of histology and is appropriate for students planning a career in veterinary science, medicine or allied health fields.

BIO 410: Introduction to Animal Behavior

  • Studies in animal behavior in vertebrates and invertebrates, focusing on the mechanisms and evolution of animal behavior. Topics include neural, hormonal and genetic bases of behavior; foraging; anti-predator defenses; mating systems and sexual selection; social behavior; communication; parental care; and territoriality and habitat selection.
  • Offered in Summer only.
  • 3 credit hours.
  • College-level biology prerequisite classes, equivalent to BIO 181 and BIO 183, are needed.
  • Intended for students with college-level background in biology, this class provides a rigorous introduction to the study of animal behavior.

BIO 424: Endocrinology

  • This course explores the function of hormones and bioactive compounds in regulating animal physiology and homeostasis. Topics will include a study of hormones and their mechanism of actions in regulating various biological processes including development and growth; reproduction; feeding, digestion and metabolism; ion and water balance; stress and immunity; and sex determination.
  • Offered year-round (Spring, Summer, and Fall).
  • 3 credit hours.
  • College-level anatomy and physiology prerequisite class needed.
  • Intended for students with college-level background in anatomy and physiology, this class provides a rigorous introduction to the discipline of endocrinology.

GN 301: Genetics in Human Affairs

  • Appreciation and understanding of genetics in everyday life. Genetic perspective on normal human development, birth defects, birth control, cancer, organ transplants, intelligence, mental illness and radiation and chemical exposure and issues raised by applications of recently developed genetic techniques such as in vitro fertilization, genetic engineering and prenatal monitoring.
  • Offered year-round (Spring, Summer, and Fall).
  • 3 credit hours.
  • No prerequisite class needed.
  • Intended for non-science students, this class provides a comprehensive introduction to genetics.

 

View Microbiology online course offerings.

 

TOX 201: Poisons, People and the Environment

  • Introduction to the fascinating world of chemical poisons including their many and varied effects on people as well as the environment. Learn how and why poisons have played an important role in history, how to critically evaluate the chemical risk information reported in the media and the underlying principles of the basic science of poisons.
  • Offered year-round (Spring, Summer and Fall).
  • 3 credit hours.
  • No prerequisite class needed.
  • Intended for non-science students, this class provides a comprehensive introduction to toxicology.

TOX 401: Principles of Toxicology

  • Introduce students to the basic principles of toxicology. Will cover the history and scope of the field; absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of toxicants; types and mechanisms of toxic action; carcinogenesis; environmental toxicology; and human and ecological risk assessment.
  • Offered in Spring only.
  • 4 credit hours.
  • College-level biology and organic chemistry prerequisite classes needed.
  • Intended for students with college-level science backgrounds, this class serves as a rigorous introduction to the discipline of toxicology.

TOX 415: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

  • Environmental toxicology and chemistry including the sources, fate and effects of chemicals in the environment. Emphasis on contemporary problems in human health and the environment.
  • Offered in Spring semester only.
  • 4 credit hours.
  • A college-level organic chemistry prerequisite class is needed, and completing a college-level biology class is also recommended before taking this class.
  • Intended for students with college-level science backgrounds, this advanced class provides a rigorous overview of the impact of chemicals in the environment.

ZO 592: Topical Problems: Introduction to Animal Behavior

  • Studies in animal behavior in vertebrates and invertebrates, focusing on the mechanisms and evolution of animal behavior. Topics include neural, hormonal and genetic bases of behavior; foraging; anti-predator defenses; mating systems and sexual selection; social behavior; communication; parental care; and territoriality and habitat selection.
  • Offered in Summer only.
  • 3 credit hours.
  • Intended for postgraduate students who already hold a bachelor’s degree and have college-level background in biology, this class provides a rigorous introduction to the study of animal behavior.

ZO 592: Topical Problems: Humans and Communicable Disease

  • This course provides a unique perspective on human communicable diseases by combining study of their pathophysiology, epidemiology, treatment and anatomy of the affected body system with study of their social impacts on human history, politics, and local and world economies.
  • Offered in Summer only.
  • 3 credit hours.
  • Intended for postgraduate students who already hold a bachelor’s degree and have college-level background in biology, this class provides a rigorous introduction to the study of human communicable diseases.